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S-RaP: A Concurrent, Evolutionary Software Prototyping Process

  • Xiping Song
  • Arnold Rudorfer
  • Beatrice Hwong
  • Gilberto Matos
  • Christopher Nelson
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 3840)

Abstract

This paper defines a highly concurrent, software rapid prototyping process that supports a sizable development team to develop a high-quality, evolutionary software prototype. The process is particularly aimed at developing user-interface intensive, workflow-centered software. The Software Engineering Department and User Interface Design Center at Siemens Corporate Research (SCR) have successfully practiced this process in prototyping a healthcare information system over the last year. We have evolved this agile, iterative software development process that tightly integrates the UI designers and the software developers with the prototype users (e.g., marketing staff), leading to efficient development of business application prototypes with mature user interfaces. We present the details of our process and the conditions that make it effective. Our experience with this process indicates that prototypes can be rapidly developed in a highly concurrent fashion given a stable prototyping software architecture and access to readily available domain knowledge.

Keywords

Software Prototype Agile Method Prototype Process Healthcare Information System Project Progress 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xiping Song
    • 1
  • Arnold Rudorfer
    • 1
  • Beatrice Hwong
    • 1
  • Gilberto Matos
    • 1
  • Christopher Nelson
    • 1
  1. 1.Siemens Corporate Research Inc.PrincetonUSA

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