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A Web-Based Environment to Improve Teaching and Learning of Computer Programming in Distance Education

  • S. C. Ng
  • S. O. Choy
  • R. Kwan
  • S. F. Chan
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 3583)

Abstract

Learning computer programming is not an easy task. Students need to spend hours doing practical activities in order to comprehend the techniques of writing computer programs and beginners usually face a number of obstacles associated with installing and using a compiler or integrated development environment. This paper introduces an online web-based system that provides an interactive integrated environment for students doing programming activities and coursework in a distance learning institution. The interactive system provides students with timely and effective feedback about programming activities without the need to have instructors and students meet at the same time and the same place. The web-based system provides students with an editing, compiling, testing and debugging environment for learning computer programming on the web. Instructors can monitor the learning progress of students, compile the student’s program and view the error messages through the student’s workplace in the online system.

Keywords

Programming Activity Program Code Error Message Integrate Development Environment Distance Learning Environment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. C. Ng
    • 1
  • S. O. Choy
    • 1
  • R. Kwan
    • 1
  • S. F. Chan
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Science and TechnologyThe Open University of Hong Kong 

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