Biometric Recognition: How Do I Know Who You Are?

  • Anil K. Jain
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 3540)

Abstract

A wide variety of systems require reliable personal recognition schemes to either confirm or determine the identity of an individual requesting their services. The purpose of such schemes is to ensure that the rendered services are accessed only by a legitimate user, and not anyone else. Examples of such applications include secure access to buildings, computer systems, laptops, cellular phones and ATMs. In the absence of robust person recognition schemes, these systems are vulnerable to the wiles of an impostor. Biometric recognition, or simply biometrics, refers to the automatic recognition of individuals based on their physiological and/or behavioral characteristics. By using biometrics it is possible to confirm or establish an individual’s identity based on who she is, rather than by what she possesses (e.g., an ID card) or what she remembers (e.g., a password). Although biometrics emerged from its extensive use in law enforcement to identify criminals, i.e., forensics, it is being increasingly used today to carry out person recognition in a large number of civilian applications (e.g., national ID card, e-passport and smart cards) [1],[2]. Most of the emerging applications can be attributed to increased security threats as well as fraud associated with various financial transactions (e.g., credit cards).

Keywords

Smart Card Biometric Data Legitimate User Biometric System Biometric Characteristic 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. 1.
    Jain, A.K., Ross, A., Prabhakar, S.: An Introduction to Biometric Recognition. IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems for Video Technology. Special Issue on Image- and Video-Based Biometrics 14, 4–20 (2004)Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Wayman, J.L., Jain, A.K., Maltoni, D., Maio, D.: Biometric Systems, Technology, Design and Performance Evaluation. Springer, Heidelberg (2005)Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Maltoni, D., Maio, D., Jain, A.K., Prabhakar, S.: Handbook of Fingerprint Recognition. Springer, Heidelberg (2003)MATHGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Li, S., Jain, A.K.: Handbook of Face Recognition. Springer, Heidelberg (2005)MATHGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Jain, A.K., Bolle, R., Pankanti, S.: Biometrics: Personal Identification in Networked Security. Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht (1999)Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Maio, D., Maltoni, D., Cappelli, R., Wayman, J.L., Jain, A.K.: FVC2004: Third fingerprint verification competition. In: Zhang, D., Jain, A.K. (eds.) ICBA 2004. LNCS, vol. 3072, pp. 1–7. Springer, Heidelberg (2004)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Philips, P.J., Grother, P., Micheals, R.J., Blackburn, D.M., Tabassi, E., Bone, J.M.: FRVT2002: Overview and Summary (2002), Available at http://www.frvt.org/FRVT2002/documents.htm
  8. 8.
    Reynolds, D.A., Campbell, W., Gleason, T., Quillen, C., Sturim, D., Torres-Carrasquillo, P., Adami, A.: The 2004 MIT Lincoln Laboratory Speaker Recognition System. In: Proceedings of IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing, Philadelphia, PA (2005)Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Pankanti, S., Prabhakar, S., Jain, A.K.: On the Individuality of Fingerprints. IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence 24, 1010–1025 (2002)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Ross, A., Jain, A.K.: Information Fusion in Biometrics. Pattern Recognition Letters, Special Issue on Multimodal Biometrics 24, 2115–2125 (2003)Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Hong, L., Jain, A.K.: Integrating Faces and Fingerprints for Personal Identification. IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence 20, 1295–1307 (1998)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Uludag, U., Jain, A.K.: Multimedia Content Protection via Biometrics-based Encryption. In: Proceedings of IEEE International Conference on Multimedia and Expo, Baltimore, USA, July 2003, vol. III, pp. 237–240 (2003)Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Uludag, U., Pankanti, S., Prabhakar, S., Jain, A.K.: Biometric Cryptosystems: Issues and Challenges. Proceedings of IEEE, Special Issue on Multimedia Security for Digital Rights Management 92, 948–960 (2004)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anil K. Jain
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer Science and EngineeringMichigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA

Personalised recommendations