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Using Clean for Platform Games

  • Mike Wiering
  • Peter Achten
  • Rinus Plasmeijer
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1868)

Abstract

In this paper, a game library for Concurrent Clean is described, specially designed for parallax scrolling platform games. Our goal is to make game programming easier by letting the programmer specify what a game should do, rather than program how it works. By integrating this library with tools for designing bitmaps and levels, it is possible to create complete games in only a fraction of the time it would take to write such games from scratch. At the moment, the library is only available for the Windows platform, but it should not be too difficult to port the low-level functions to other platforms. This may eventually provide an easy way to create games that run on several platforms.

Keywords

Main Character Functional Programming Game State Game Engine Game Developer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mike Wiering
    • 1
  • Peter Achten
    • 1
  • Rinus Plasmeijer
    • 1
  1. 1.Computing Science InstituteUniversity of NijmegenNijmegenThe Netherlands

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