Non-human genetics, agricultural origins and historical linguistics in South Asia

  • Dorian Q Fuller
Part of the Vertebrate Paleobiology and Paleoanthropology Series book series (VERT)

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© Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dorian Q Fuller
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Archaeology, University College LondonEngland

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