Biological Pest Control in Mix and Match Forests

  • R. G. Van Driesche

Keywords

Biological Control Natural Enemy Exotic Tree Classical Biological Control Native Herbivore 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. G. Van Driesche
    • 1
  1. 1.Department PSIS: Division of EntomologyUniversity of MassachusettsAmherstMA 01003

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