Advertisement

Mathematical Practices In And Across School Contexts

  • Jill Adler
Chapter
  • 661 Downloads
Part of the Logic, Epistemology, and the Unity of Science book series (LEUS, volume 5)

Abstract

This paper describes some mathematical practices in and across school contexts in South Africa. Through this description, I challenge a decontextualised notion of schooling and so too a decontextualised notion of mathematical practices in school. Through examples of mathematical practices within and across school contexts in South Africa, I illustrate what is well known in the field of sociology of education – that school mathematics and its associated practices are social at their core. They are a function of how knowledge in society is selected, transmitted and evaluated through schooling. These are socio-political processes and so vary considerably within and across social contexts, and inevitable function of the distribution of power and social control in society (Bernstein, 1996).

Keywords

School mathematics mathematical practices South Africa 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Adler, J. (1997). A participatory-inquiry approach and the mediation of mathematical knowledge in a multilingual classroom.Educational Studies in Mathematics, 33, 235–258.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Adler, J. (2001). Teaching mathematics in multilingual classrooms. Dordrecht: Kluwer.Google Scholar
  3. Adler, J. (2002) Global and local challenges of teacher development. Adler, J., & Reed, Y. (Eds.) Challenges of teacher development: An investigation of take-up in South Africa. Pretoria: Van Schaik. Pp. 1-16. (2002).Google Scholar
  4. Adler, J., & Reed, Y. (Eds.) (2002). Challenges of teacher development: An investigation of take-up in South Africa. Pretoria: Van Schaik.Google Scholar
  5. Alexander, R. (2000) Culture and Pedagogy. Oxford: Blackwells.Google Scholar
  6. Bernstein, B. (1996).Pedagogy, symbolic control and identity: Theory, research and critique. London: Taylor & Francis.Google Scholar
  7. Ball, D. and Bass, H. (2000) Interweaving content and pedagogy in teaching and learning to teach: Knowing and using mathematics. Boaler, J. (Ed.) Multiple perspectives on mathematics teaching and learning. Westport: Ablex Publishing. Pp.83-104.Google Scholar
  8. Boaler, J. and Greeno, J. (2000) Identity, agency and knowing in mathematics worlds. Boaler, J. (Ed.) Multiple perspectives on mathematics teaching and learning. Westport: Ablex Publishing. Pp.171-200.Google Scholar
  9. Boaler, J. (2002) Experiencing school mathematics. Mahwah: Lawrence Erlbaum.Google Scholar
  10. Brodie, Lelliott and Davis 2002 Brodie, K., Lelliott, A., & Davis, H.(2002) Forms and substance in learner-centred teaching: teachers’ take-up from an in-service programme in South Africa. Teaching and Teacher Education, 18(5), 541-559.Google Scholar
  11. Department of Education (DoE) (2001). Revised National Curriculum Statement: Overview. Pretoria: Department of Education.Google Scholar
  12. Department of Education (DoE) (2002). National Curriculum Statement: FET Mathematics. Pretoria: Department of Education.Google Scholar
  13. Graven, M. (2002) Mathematics teacher learning: Communities of practices and the centrality of confidence. Unpublished doctoral thesis. Johannesburg: University of the Witwatersrand.Google Scholar
  14. Howie, S. (1998). TIMSS in South Africa: The value of international comparative studies for a developing country. J. Adler (Ed.), Perspectives on the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (Proceedings of a National Seminar, Mathematics Education Development Programme, Johannesburg: University of the Witwatersrand. pp. 22–40).Google Scholar
  15. Howie, S and Plomp, T. (2002) School and classroom level factors and pupils’ achievement in mathematics in South Africa: A closer look at the South African TIMSS-R data. Malcolm, C and Lubisi, C. (Eds.)Proceedings of the 10th Annual conference of the Southern African Association for Research in Mathematics, Science and Technology Education. Durban: University of Natal. Pp. 116-123.Google Scholar
  16. Mwakapenda, W. and Adler, J. (2002) “Do I still remember?”: Using concept mapping to explore student understanding of key concepts in secondary mathematics. Malcolm, C and Lubisi, C. (Eds.) Proceedings of the 10th Annual conference of the Southern African Association for Research in Mathematics, Science and Technology Education. Durban: University of Natal. Pp. 60 – 67.Google Scholar
  17. National Council for Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) (2000). Principles and standards for school mathematics. Virginia: NCTM.Google Scholar
  18. Parker, D. (1999) Images of mathematics and mathematics teachers. Unpublished paper presented at a one-day conference on Researching formalised INSET in mathematics, science and English at the University of the Witwatersrand. Johannesburg.Google Scholar
  19. Skovsmose, O. (1994) Towards a philosophy of critical mathematics education. Dordrecht: Kluwer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jill Adler
    • 1
  1. 1.University of the WitwatersrandJohannesburgSouth Africa

Personalised recommendations