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Prepared for diversity? Teacher education for lower primary classes in Malawi

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Keywords

Student Teacher Inclusive Education Initial Teacher Education Salamanca Statement Pupil Diversity 
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Copyright information

© Springer 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Sussex School of EducationUniversity of SussexUK

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