CROSSBORDER EDUCATION: AN ANALYTICAL FRAMEWORK FOR PROGRAM AND PROVIDER MOBILITY

  • Jane Knight
Part of the Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research book series (HATR, volume 21)

Abstract

It is true that academic mobility and education exchange across borders have been a central feature of higher education for centuries. The fact that “universe” is key to the concept of university demonstrates the presence of the international dimension since the founding of universities as institutions of higher education and research. The international mobility of students and scholars are longstanding forms of academic mobility but, it is only during the last two decades that more emphasis has been placed on the movement of education programs, higher education institutions (HEIs), and new commercial providers across national borders.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jane Knight
    • 1
  1. 1.University of TorontoTorontoCanada

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