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Using Indicators of School Readiness to Improve Public Policy for Young Children

  • LISA G. KLEIN
Part of the Social Indicators Research Series book series (SINS, volume 27)

Abstract

Research has shown that children are most successful as they enter schoolwhen they have developed the emotional capability to manage their feelings and behavior and when they have a base of strong academic and social skills. The research base also shows that children experience the greatest success in the early elementary years when families are involved in their children’s education, when teachers understand healthy child development, and when communities offer support that helps children and families grow and thrive.

Keywords

Indicator Data National Meeting State Team Child Trend Healthy Child Development 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • LISA G. KLEIN
    • 1
  1. 1.Hestia AdvisingKansas CityUSA

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