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The Role of Social Indicators in an Era of Human Service Reform in the United States

  • TOM CORBETT
Chapter
Part of the Social Indicators Research Series book series (SINS, volume 27)

Abstract

We have long sought to employ social indicators to measure the condition of society and of subpopulations of interest (Hauser et al., 1997; Miringoff, 1993; Miringoff et al., 1999). In recent years, however, developing and using social indicators in ways that substantively shape public policies has emerged as a seminal interest and challenge. Motivating this interest are several concurrent reform movements that, in turn, are reshaping the way human services are organized and delivered in the United States.

Keywords

Social Indicator Social Assistance Child Poverty Service Integration Welfare Reform 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • TOM CORBETT
    • 1
  1. 1.University of WisconsinMadisonUSA

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