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The Radiophysics Field Stations and the Early Development of Radio Astronomy

  • Wayne Orchiston
  • Bruce Slee
Part of the Astrophysics and Space Science Library book series (ASSL, volume 334)

Abstract

During the period 1946–1961 Australia was one of the world’s leading nations in radio astronomy and played a key role in its development. Much of the research was carried out at a number of different field stations and associated remote sites situated in or near Sydney which were maintained by the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation’s Division of Radiophysics. The best-known of these were Dover Heights, Dapto, Fleurs, Hornsby Valley and Potts Hill. At these and other field stations a succession of innovative radio telescopes was erected, and these were used by a band of young scientists—mainly men with engineering qualifications—to address a wide range of research issues, often with outstanding success.

Key words

Radio astronomy Australia field stations Badgerys Creek Dapto Dover Heights Fleurs Georges Heights Hornsby Valley Murraybank Penrith Potts Hill solar radio emission ‘radio stars’ H-line emission 

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Copyright information

© Springer 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wayne Orchiston
    • 1
  • Bruce Slee
    • 2
  1. 1.Anglo-Australian Observatory & Australia Telescope National FacilityEppingAustralia
  2. 2.Australia Telescope National FacilityEppingAustralia

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