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Grote Reber (1911–2002)

A Radio Astronomy Pioneer
  • K. I. Kellermann
Part of the Astrophysics and Space Science Library book series (ASSL, volume 334)

Abstract

A forceful personality and self-confidence led Grote Reber to a series of remarkable discoveries in radio astronomy, and later to a wide variety of research in many other fields of science and technology. Although he worked primarily as an amateur, independently of the scientific establishment, Reber was ultimately recognized with many of the major prizes in astronomy.

Key words

Grote Reber radio astronomy electronics amateur radio history beans geology archeology 

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13. Publications by Grote Reber

  1. Reber, G., 1935. Optimum design of toroidal inductances. Proceedings of the Institute of Radio Engineers, 23, 1056–1068.Google Scholar
  2. Reber, G., 1935. Radio frequency resistance for different wire sizes. R/9, No, 67 (June), 18–19.Google Scholar
  3. Reber, G., 1938. Electric resonance chambers. Communications, 18, (December), 5–8.Google Scholar
  4. Reber, G., and Conklin, E.H., 1938. High frequency receivers: improving their performance. Radio, No. 225 (January), 112–115.Google Scholar
  5. Reber, G., 1938. High-frequency triode oscillators. Communications, 18, (March), 13–15.Google Scholar
  6. Reber, G., 1939. Electromagnetic horns. Communications, 19, (February), 13–15.Google Scholar
  7. Reber, G., and Conklin, E.H., 1939. An improved U.H.F. receiver. Radio, No. 235 (January), 17–22.Google Scholar
  8. Reber, G., 1940a. Cosmic static. Astrophysical Journal, 91, 621–624.CrossRefADSGoogle Scholar
  9. Reber, G., 1940b. Cosmic static. Proceedings of the Institute of Radio Engineers, 28, 68–70.Google Scholar
  10. Reber, G., 1942. Cosmic static. Proceedings of the Institute of Radio Engineers, 30, 367–378.Google Scholar
  11. Reber, G., 1944. Cosmic static. Astrophysical Journal, 100, 279–287.CrossRefADSGoogle Scholar
  12. Reber, G., 1944. Filter networks for UHF amplifiers. Electronic Industries, 3, 86–89, 192–198.Google Scholar
  13. Reber, G., 1944. Reflector efficiency. Electronic Industries, 3, (July), 101.Google Scholar
  14. Reber, G., 1946. Solar radiation at 480 Mc./sec. Nature, 158, 945.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Reber, G., 1947. Antenna focal devices for parabolic mirrors. Proceedings of the Institute of Radio Engineers, 35, 731–734.Google Scholar
  16. Reber, G., and Greenstein, Jesse L., 1947. Radio-frequency investigations of astronomical interest. The Observatory, 67, 15–26.ADSGoogle Scholar
  17. Reber, G., 1948. Cosmic radio noise. Radio-Electronic Engineering, 11, 3–5, 29–30.Google Scholar
  18. Reber, G., 1948. Cosmic static. Proceedings of the Institute of Radio Engineers, 36, 1215–1218.Google Scholar
  19. Reber, G., 1948. Solar intensity at 480 Mc. Proceedings of the Institute of Radio Engineers, 36, 88.Google Scholar
  20. Reber, G., 1949. Galactic radio waves. Sky and Telescope, 8, 139–141.ADSGoogle Scholar
  21. Reber, G., 1949. Radio astronomy. Proceedings of the Institute of Radio Engineers, 37, 315–316.Google Scholar
  22. Reber, G., 1949. Radio astronomy. Scientific American, 181(3), 34–41.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Reber, G., 1950. Funkwellen-astronomie. Physikalische Blatter, 6, 122–127.Google Scholar
  24. Reber, G., 1950. Galactic radio waves. Astronomical Society of the Pacific Leaflet, No. 259.Google Scholar
  25. Reber, G., 1950. Radio astronomie. Voice of America, 6–7.Google Scholar
  26. Reber, G., 1951. Motion in the solar atmosphere as deduced from radio measurements. Science, 113, 312–314.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Hagen, John P., Haddock, Fred T., and Reber, G., 1951. NRL Aleutian radio eclipse expedition. Sky and Telescope, 10(5), 111–113.ADSGoogle Scholar
  28. Reber, G., 1951. Radio astronomie. La Voix de l’Amerique, January/February, 6–7.Google Scholar
  29. Reber, G., 1951. Solar radio waves; Galactic radio waves. Proceedings of the Institute of Radio Engineers, 39, 395–396.Google Scholar
  30. Reber, G., 1954. Interferometric work in Hawaii. Journal of Geophysical Research, 59, 158.Google Scholar
  31. Reber, G., 1954. Spread F over Hawaii. Journal of Geophysical Research, 59, 257–265.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Reber, G., 1954. Spread F over Washington. Journal of Geophysical Research, 59, 445–448.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Reber, G., 1955. Eliminating power plant radiation. Tele-Tech &Electronic Industries, 14(5), 77, 135–140.Google Scholar
  34. Reber, G., 1955. Fine structure of solar radio transients. Nature, 175, 132.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Reber, G., 1955. Radio astronomy in Hawaii. Nature, 175, 78–79.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Reber, G., 1955. Tropospheric refraction near Hawaii. IRE Transactions on Antennas and Propagation, 3, 143–144.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Reber, G., and G.R. Ellis. 1956 Cosmic radio-frequency radiation near one megacycle. Journal of Geophysical Research, 61, 1–10.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. Reber, G., 1956. World-wide Spread F. Journal of Geophysical Research, 61, 157–164.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. Reber, G., 1957. Atmospheric Pressure Atop Haleakala. Australian Meteorological Magazine, 18 (Sept), 50–54.Google Scholar
  40. Reber, G., 1957. Long-wave radiation of possible celestial origin. In Symposium on Radio Astronomy (September 1956). Melbourne, CSIRO. Pp. 53–54.Google Scholar
  41. Reber, G., 1958. Between the atmospherics. Journal of Geophysical Research, 63, 109–123.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. Reber, G., 1958. Early radio astronomy in Wheaton, Illinois. Proceedings of the Institute of Radio Engineers, 46, 15–23.Google Scholar
  43. Reber, G., 1958. Solar activity cycle and Spread F (Letter to Editor). Journal of Geophysical Research, 63, 869.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  44. Reber, G., 1959. Age of lava flows on Haleakala Hawaii. Bulletin of the Geological Society of America, 70, 1245–1246.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. Reber, G., 1959. Atmospheric pressure oscillations atop Haleakala. Australian Meteorological Magazine, 26 (September), 99–103.Google Scholar
  46. Reber, G., 1959. Negative feedback a third of a century ago. Proceedings of the Institute of Radio Engineers, 47, 1275.Google Scholar
  47. Reber, G., 1959. Radio interferometry at three kilometers altitude above the Pacific Ocean. Part I: installation and ionosphere. Part II: celestial sources. Journal of Geophysical Research, 64, 287–303.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  48. Reber, G., 1959. Suppressed sidelobe antenna of 32 elements. IRE Transactions on Antennas and Propagation, 7, 101.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  49. Reber, G., 1959. Temperature and humidity atop Haleakala. Australian Meteorological Magazine, 24 (Mar), 73–79.Google Scholar
  50. Reber, G., 1960. Broad-band amplifier of nearly forty years ago. Proceedings of the Institute of Radio Engineers, 48, 2040.Google Scholar
  51. Reber, G., 1960. Cosmic static at kilometer wavelengths. In Symposium on Sun-Earth Environment (July 1959). Ottawa, DTRE Publication, 1025, 243–248.Google Scholar
  52. Reber, G., 1960. Reversed bean vines. Castanea, 25, 122–124.Google Scholar
  53. Reber, G., 1961. History of the cross antenna. Proceedings of the Institute of Radio Engineers, 49, 529.Google Scholar
  54. Reber, G., 1962. Age of lava flows on Haleakala Hawaii: reply with additional information. Bulletin of the Geological Society of America, 73, 1303.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  55. Reber, G., 1963. Messier 1 (Letter to Science). Science, 139, 677.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  56. Reber, G., 1963. Terrestrial Magnetosphere (Letter to Science). Science, 140, 1362.ADSGoogle Scholar
  57. Reber, G., 1964. Hectometer cosmic static. IEEE Transactions on Military Electronics, 8, 257–263.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  58. Reber, G., 1964. Hectometer cosmic static. IEEE Transactions on Antennas and Propagation, 12, 923–929.CrossRefADSGoogle Scholar
  59. Reber, G., 1964. Reversed bean vines. Journal of Genetics, 59, 37–40.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  60. Reber, G., 1965. Aboriginal carbon dates from Tasmania. Mankind, 6, 264–268.Google Scholar
  61. Reber, G., 1966a. Cosmic ray astronomy. Journal of the Franklin Institute, 281, 1–8.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  62. Reber, G., 1966b. Ground-based astronomy: The NAS 10-year program. Science, 152, 150.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  63. Reber, G., 1967. Atmospheric pressure oscillations in Tasmania. Australian Meteorological Magazine, 15(3), 156–160.Google Scholar
  64. Reber, G., 1967. Book review: John Kraus: Radio Astronomy (McGraw-Hill, 1966). Journal of the Franklin Institute, 283, 175–176.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  65. Reber, G., 1967. New Aboriginal carbon dates from Tasmania. Mankind, 6, 435–437.Google Scholar
  66. Reber, G., 1967. Unusual variation in Phaseolus Vulgaris. Australian Journal of Experimental Agriculture and Animal Husbandry, 7, 377–379.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  67. Reber, G., 1968. Cosmic static at 144 meters wavelength. Journal of the Franklin Institute, 285, 1–12.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  68. Chu, William T., Kim, Young S., and Reber, G., 1970. Cosmic ray muons from low Galactic latitude. Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, 82, 339–344.CrossRefADSGoogle Scholar
  69. Reber, G., 1977. Endless, Boundless, Stable Universe. Hobart, University of Tasmania (Occasional Papers, No. 9).Google Scholar
  70. Reber, G., 1982. Big-Bang creationism (Letter to Editor). Physics Today, 35(11), 108–109.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  71. Reber, G., 1982. My adventures in Tasmania. Tasmanian Tramp, No. 24, 148–151.Google Scholar
  72. Reber, G., 1982. A timeless, boundless, equilibrium Universe. Proceedings of the Astronomical Society of Australia, 4, 482–483.ADSGoogle Scholar
  73. Reber, G., 1983. Inflationary Universe (Letter to Editor). Physics Today, 36(10), 122.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  74. Reber, G., 1984a. Early radio astronomy in Wheaton, Illinois. In Sullivan, W.T. (ed.). Early Years of Radio Astronomy. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press. Pp. 43–66 (reprinted from Proceedings of the Institute of Radio Engineers, 46, 15–2 (1958)).Google Scholar
  75. Reber, G., 1984b. Radio astronomy between Jansky and Reber. In Kellermann, K., and Sheets, B. (eds.). Serendipitous Discoveries in Radio Astronomy. Green Bank, National Radio Astronomical Observatory. Pp. 71–78.Google Scholar
  76. Reber, G., 1986. Intergalactic plasma. IEEE Transactions on Plasma Science, 14, 678–682.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  77. Ellis, G.R.A., Klekociuk, A., Woods, A.C., Reber, G., Goldstone, G.T. Burns, G. Dyson, P., Essex, E., and Mendillo, M., 1987. Low-frequency radioastronomical observations during the Spacelab 2 plasma depletion experiment. Australian Physicist, 24, 56–58.Google Scholar
  78. Mendillo, M., Baumgardner, J., Allen, D.P., Foster, J., Holt, J., Ellis, G.R.A., Klekociuk, A., and Reber, G., 1987. Spacelab-2 plasma depletion experiments for ionospheric and radio astronomical studies. Science, 238, 1260–1264.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  79. Reber, G., 1988. A play entitled The Beginning of Radio Astronomy. Journal of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada, 82, 93–106.ADSGoogle Scholar
  80. Ellis, G.R.A., Klekociuk, A., Woods, A.C., Reber, G., Goldstone, G.T., Burns, G., Dyson, P., Essex, E., and Mendillo, M., 1988. Radioastronomy through an artificial ionospheric window: Spacelab 2 observations. Advances in Space Research, 8(1), 63–66.CrossRefADSGoogle Scholar
  81. Marmet, P., and Reber, G., 1989. Cosmic matter and the nonexpanding Universe. IEEE Transactions on Plasma Science, 17, 264–269.ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  82. Reber, G., and Street, M., 1990. Hectometer and kilometer wavelength radio astronomy. In Kassim, N.E., and Weiler, K.W. (eds.). Low Frequency Astrophysics from Space. Berlin, Springer-Verlag. Pp. 42–45.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  83. Reber, G., 1990. Projects for amateur radio astronomers (Letter to Editor). Journal of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada, 84, 10.ADSGoogle Scholar
  84. Reber, G., 1994a. Hectometer radio astronomy. Journal of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada, 88, 297–302.ADSGoogle Scholar
  85. Reber, G., 1995. Intergalactic plasma. Astrophysics and Space Science, 227, 93–96.CrossRefADSGoogle Scholar

14. Other References

  1. Allied Pickford, 1994. Telegram to K.I. Kellermann, dated 11 July. In NRAO Archives.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. I. Kellermann
    • 1
  1. 1.National Radio Astronomy ObservatoryCharlottevilleUSA

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