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Phenomenology of Lifelong Learning

  • Kiymet Selvi
Part of the Analecta Husserliana book series (ANHU, volume 90)

Keywords

Lifelong Learning Formal Learning Learning Society Expand Dynamics Lifelong Education 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kiymet Selvi
    • 1
  1. 1.Anadolu UniversityTurkey

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