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Manila Bay: Environmental Challenges and Opportunities

  • G. S. Jacinto
  • R. V. Azanza
  • I. B. Velasquez
  • F. P. Siringan

4. Conclusion

Manila Bay has a wide range of environmental problems that need to be addressed — from land-based and sea-based sources of pollution to harmful algal blooms, subsidence and groundwater extraction, overexploitation of fishery resources, and habitat conversion and degradation. However, there are reasons to be optimistic. There is greater accountability expected of public officials vis-a-vis environmental laws, significant and increasing infrastructure investments to treat and reduce domestic sewage discharges into the bay, the implementation of the Manila Bay Environmental Management Project, and the adoption the concept and practice of ICM by local government units and communities around Manila Bay.

The Manila Bay Coastal Strategy’s response to the many issues confronting the bay is articulated as follows:

“Manila Bay stakeholders are partners in: raising public awareness and participation, protecting human welfare, ecological, historical, cultural and economic features, mitigating environmental risks, implementing effective policies and environment management and governance, and developing areas and opportunities in a sustainable manner.”

Time will tell if the envisioned response will be pursued and continued so that Manila Bay will revert to be a clean, safe, wholesome, and productive ecosystem for the present and future generations.

We acknowledge with thanks the help and assistance of Dr. Laura David, Roselle Ty Borja, and Iris Uy Baula. We are also grateful to the Philippine Coast Guard for giving us access to the most recent oil spill data.

Keywords

Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon International Maritime Organization Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning Global Environment Facility Asian Development Bank 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. S. Jacinto
    • 1
  • R. V. Azanza
    • 1
  • I. B. Velasquez
    • 1
  • F. P. Siringan
    • 2
  1. 1.Marine Science InstituteUniversity of the PhilippinesDiliman, Quezon CityPhilippines
  2. 2.National Institute of Geological SciencesUniversity of the PhilippinesDiliman, Quezon CityPhilippines

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