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Through a Murky Mirror

Self Study of a Program in Reading and Literacy
  • Helen Freidus
Chapter
Part of the Self Study of Teaching and Teacher Education Practices book series (STEP, volume 2)

Abstract

For the past five years we have been examining the Reading and Literacy Program at Bank Street College of Education. Motivated by a mandated New York State recertification process, NCATE and Middle States certification processes, and, most of all, by our own desire to prepare our students to meet the needs of children in today’s classrooms, we have been looking closely at the form and content of our program. The guiding questions have been: Do the values and practices that shape a teacher education program grounded in progressive theory stand today’s students in good stead? What needs to be preserved? What needs to be changed? These questions have become ever more compelling as our vision of good teaching has been increasingly challenged by a climate of increasing standardization.

Keywords

Advisement Process Conference Group Bank Street Supervise Fieldwork 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Helen Freidus
    • 1
  1. 1.Bank Street College of EducationNew York City

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