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Psycho-Sociological Issues of Spaceflight

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Part of the The Space Technology Library book series (SPTL, volume 17)

Keywords

Space Mission Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory Mission Control Nuclear Submarine Space Medicine 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Additional Documentation

  1. A Strategy for Research in Space Biology and Medicine in the New Century (1998) Space Studies Board, National Research Council. Washington, DC: National Academy PressGoogle Scholar
  2. From Antarctic to Outer Space: Life in Isolation and Confinement (1991) A Harrison, Y Clearwater, C McKay (eds.). New York, NY: Springer-VerlagGoogle Scholar
  3. International Workshop on Human Factors in Space (2000) Aviation, Space and Environmental Medicine 71, Number. 9, Section II, SupplementGoogle Scholar
  4. Lessons Learned from SFINCSS-99 and its Application to Behavioral Support Program (2002) NASDA TMR-02002Google Scholar
  5. Review of NASA’s Biomedical Research Program (2000) Committee on Space Biology and Medicine, Space Studies Board, National Research Council. National Academy PressGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer 2005

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