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Ideas of a Uuniversity, Faculty Governance, and Governmentality

  • Susan Talburt
Part of the Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research book series (HATR, volume 20)

Keywords

High Education Faculty Member Cultural Capital Common Good Faculty Work 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susan Talburt
    • 1
  1. 1.Georgia State University

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