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Investments in Human Capital: Sources of Variation in the Return to College Quality

  • Liang Zhang
  • Scott L. Thomas
Part of the Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research book series (HATR, volume 20)

Keywords

Human Capital Educational Attainment Family Income High School Graduate Private Institution 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Liang Zhang
    • 1
  • Scott L. Thomas
    • 2
  1. 1.Cornell UniversityUSA
  2. 2.University of Georgia

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