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An inflectional approach to Hausa final vowel shortening

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Keywords

  • Direct Object
  • Argument Structure
  • Indirect Object
  • Vowel Length
  • Verbal Noun

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Crysmann, B. (2005). An inflectional approach to Hausa final vowel shortening. In: Booij, G., van Marle, J. (eds) Yearbook of Morphology 2004. Yearbook of Morphology. Springer, Dordrecht. https://doi.org/10.1007/1-4020-2900-4_4

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