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Methods of Assessment of Thermal Striping Fatigue Damage

  • Ian S. Jones
Part of the Solid Mechanics and Its Applications book series (SMIA, volume 113)

Abstract

The phenomenon of high-cycle fatigue crack growth, caused by thermal striping on metallic components, is examined. A general outline of the mathematical models used for the assessment of thermal striping damage will be presented. Comparisons between all of these models and the finite element method will also be given for the calculation of stress intensity factors.

Keywords

Stress Intensity Factor Power Spectral Density Stress Intensity Factor Crack Depth Circumferential Crack 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ian S. Jones
    • 1
  1. 1.School of EngineeringJohn Moores UniversityLiverpoolUK

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