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Historical and Socio-cultural Origins of Amazonian Dark Earth

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Amazonian Dark Earths

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Neves, E.G., Petersen, J.B., Bartone, R.N., Augusto Da Silva, C. (2003). Historical and Socio-cultural Origins of Amazonian Dark Earth. In: Lehmann, J., Kern, D.C., Glaser, B., Wodos, W.I. (eds) Amazonian Dark Earths. Springer, Dordrecht. https://doi.org/10.1007/1-4020-2597-1_3

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