Death, Dying, Euthanasia, and Palliative Care: Perspectives from Philosophy of Medicine and Ethics

  • B. Andrew Lustig
Part of the Philosophy and Medicine book series (PHME, volume 78)

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. Andrew Lustig
    • 1
  1. 1.Program on Biotechnology, Religion and EthicsRice UniversityHoustonUSA

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