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Development and Socialization in Childhood

  • William A. Corsaro
  • Laura Fingerson
Part of the Handbooks of Sociology and Social Research book series (HSSR)

Keywords

Parenting Style African American Child Child Poverty Street Child Interpretive Approach 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • William A. Corsaro
    • 1
  • Laura Fingerson
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of SociologyIndiana UniversityBloomington
  2. 2.Department of SociologyUniversity of Wisconsin-MilwaukeeMilwaukee

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