Social Structure and Personality

  • Jane D. McLeod
  • Kathryn J. Lively
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Part of the Handbooks of Sociology and Social Research book series (HSSR)

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jane D. McLeod
    • 1
  • Kathryn J. Lively
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of SociologyIndiana UniversityBlommington
  2. 2.Department of SociologyDartmouth CollegeHanover

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