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Cross-Cultural Social Psychology

  • Karen Miller-Loessi
  • John N. Parker
Part of the Handbooks of Sociology and Social Research book series (HSSR)

Keywords

Social Psychology Cultural Dimension American Sociological Review Primary Emotion Emic Approach 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Authors and Affiliations

  • Karen Miller-Loessi
    • 1
  • John N. Parker
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of SociologyArizona State UniversityTempe

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