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Social Psychological Perspectives on Crowds and Social Movements

  • Deana A. Rohlinger
  • David A. Snow
Part of the Handbooks of Sociology and Social Research book series (HSSR)

Keywords

Collective Action Social Movement Rational Choice Collective Behavior American Sociological Review 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Deana A. Rohlinger
    • 1
  • David A. Snow
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of SociologyUniversity of California-IrvineIrvine

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