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Social Structure and Psychological Functioning

Distress, Perceived Control, and Trust
  • Catherine E. Ross
  • John Mirowsky
Part of the Handbooks of Sociology and Social Research book series (HSSR)

Conclusion

Some conditions rob people of control over their own lives. Joblessness, dependency, alienated labor, victimization, disadvantage, and disorder ingrain a sense of powerlessness and mistrust that demoralizes and distresses. The most destructive situations hide from people in them the fact that everyone has a choice. However threatening or constricting the situation, it is better to try to understand and solve the problems than it is to avoid or meekly bear them as the inevitable burden of life.

Keywords

Social Capital Psychological Distress Social Behavior Objective Condition Psychological Functioning 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Catherine E. Ross
    • 1
  • John Mirowsky
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Sociology and Population Research CenterUniversity of TexasAustin

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