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Keywords

Negative Emotion Positive Emotion Emotional Intelligence Identity Theory Emotional Competence 
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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jan E. Stets
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of SociologyUniversity of CaliforniaRiversideUSA

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