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Ideologies, Values, Attitudes, and Behavior

  • Gregory R. Maio
  • James M. Olson
  • Mark M. Bernard
  • Michelle A. Luke
Part of the Handbooks of Sociology and Social Research book series (HSSR)

Keywords

Political Attitude Attitude Object Experimental Social Psychology Social Psychology Bulletin Indirect Experience 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gregory R. Maio
    • 1
  • James M. Olson
    • 2
  • Mark M. Bernard
    • 1
  • Michelle A. Luke
    • 1
  1. 1.School of PsychologyCardiff UniversityCardiff, WalesUK
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Western OntarioLondonCanada

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