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Untraceable Electronic Cash

(Extended Abstract)

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Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS,volume 403)

Abstract

The use of credit cards today is an act of faith on the p a t of all concerned. Each party is vulnerable to fraud by the others, and the cardholder in particular has no protection against surveillance.

Keywords

  • Proper Form
  • Account Number
  • Boolean Circuit
  • Major Candidate
  • Digital Signature Scheme

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Work done while the second and third authors were at the University of California at Berkeley. The work of the second author was supported by a Weizmann Postdoctoral Fellowship and by NSF Grants DCR 84-11954 and DCR 85-13926. The work of the third author was supported by NSF Grants DCR 85-13926 and CCR 88-13632.

References

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© 1990 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg

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Chaum, D., Fiat, A., Naor, M. (1990). Untraceable Electronic Cash. In: Goldwasser, S. (eds) Advances in Cryptology — CRYPTO’ 88. CRYPTO 1988. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol 403. Springer, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/0-387-34799-2_25

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/0-387-34799-2_25

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  • Publisher Name: Springer, New York, NY

  • Print ISBN: 978-0-387-97196-4

  • Online ISBN: 978-0-387-34799-8

  • eBook Packages: Springer Book Archive

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