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Evolvable Optical Systems

  • Hirokazu Nosato
  • Masahiro Murakawa
  • Yuji Kasai
  • Tetsuya Higuchi
Part of the Genetic and Evolutionary Computation book series (GEVO)

Abstract

This chapter describes evolvable optical systems and their applications developed at the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) in Japan. Five evolvable optical systems are described: (1) an evolvable femtosecond laser system, (2) an automatic wave-front correction system, (3) a multiobjective adjustment system, (4) an automatic optical fiber alignment system, and (5) an evolvable interferometer system. As the micron-meter resolution alignment of optical components usually takes a long time, to overcome this time problem, we propose five systems that can automatically align the positioning of optical components by genetic algorithms (GA) in very short times compared to conventional systems.

Key words

genetic algorithms optical system laser system automatic alignment fiber alignment 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hirokazu Nosato
    • 1
  • Masahiro Murakawa
    • 1
  • Yuji Kasai
    • 1
  • Tetsuya Higuchi
    • 1
  1. 1.Advanced Semiconductor Research CenterNational Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and TechnologyJapan

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