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Perchlorate pp 71-91 | Cite as

Alternative Causes of Wide-Spread, Low Concentration Perchlorate Impacts to Groundwater

  • Carol Aziz
  • Robert Borch
  • Paul Nicholson
  • Evan Cox

Conclusions

The frequency of detection of perchlorate impacts to soil, groundwater and surface water, unrelated to military activities, is likely to increase as water utilities analyze for this constituent as part of their UCMR monitoring programs. Based on emerging product and process information, perchlorate is present (intentionally or not) in many more products and processes than initially understood. Furthermore, evidence exists that perchlorate can be formed naturally in evaporate deposits and through atmospheric mechanisms.

The U.S. DOD, NASA and related defense contractors are likely to be the most significant domestic users of perchlorate in North America, and as such, a significant percentage of identified groundwater perchlorate impacts are attributable to DOD, NASA, and related defense contractor facilities. However, cases exist, and many more are likely to surface, where perchlorate impacts result from combinations of military, non-military, and/or natural inputs.

Keywords

Sodium Nitrate Public Water Supply Sodium Perchlorate Chlorine Dioxide Sodium Chlorate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carol Aziz
    • 1
  • Robert Borch
    • 1
  • Paul Nicholson
    • 1
  • Evan Cox
    • 1
  1. 1.GeoSyntec ConsultantsGuelphCanada

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