If Business Models Could Speak! Efficient: a Framework for Appraisal, Design and Simulation of Electronic Business Transactions

  • Michael Schmitt
  • Bertrand Grégoire
  • Christophe Incoul
  • Sophie Ramel
  • Pierre Brimont
  • Eric Dubois
Part of the IFIP — The International Federation for Information Processing book series (IFIPAICT, volume 183)

Abstract

In this paper we investigate the development of an appropriate business model associated with B2B transactions, designed according to the newly introduced ebXML standards. We explain the added value of such business model in complement to the more technical models defined by ebXML. In particular we explain the importance of achieving a better definition of the economic value associated with a B2B transaction. Together with the proposed business model ontology we also introduce a tool for supporting its management as well as a simulation tool for supporting decision making between different models.

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Copyright information

© International Federation for Information Processing 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Schmitt
  • Bertrand Grégoire
  • Christophe Incoul
  • Sophie Ramel
  • Pierre Brimont
  • Eric Dubois
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre de Recherche Public Henri TudorKennedyLuxembourg

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