Generativity and Adult Development: Implications for Mobilizing Volunteers in Support of Youth

  • Andrea S. Taylor
Chapter
Part of the The Search Institute Series on Developmentally Attentive Community and Society book series (SISS, volume 4)

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrea S. Taylor
    • 1
  1. 1.Temple University Center for Intergenerational LearningPhiladelphia

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