Missing Links, Imaginary Links: Staff God Imagery in the South Andean Past

  • William H. Isbell
  • Patricia J. Knobloch

Abstract

Early in the Middle Horizon, a new set of religious images appeared in the ceramic arts of Central Peru, demonstrating radical ideological change that almost certainly documents the adoption of a new religion. Eventually the images became official symbols of allegiance to the Huari empire, as its political strength expanded from a capital in the Ayacucho Valley, subjecting older polities throughout much of Peru. Significantly, similar icons occurred at the Bolivian site of Tiwanaku and throughout its great sphere of influence to the south of Huari.

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  • William H. Isbell
  • Patricia J. Knobloch

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