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Oil- and fat-based foods

  • T. A. Roberts{roJoint Chairman}
  • J.-L. Cordier
  • L. Gram
  • R. B. Tompkin
  • J. I. Pitt{roJoint Chairman}
  • L. G. M. Gorris
  • K. M. J. Swanson
Chapter

Foods based on oils and fats represent a large proportion of the energy intake in the diet of consumers in most of the world. Nutritional advice is to limit the amount of fat in the overall diet, in particular of saturated fat. As a result, the past decades have shown a reduction in the per capita consumption of oil- and fat-based foods in developed countries and a relative shift to low-fat/low-calorie products. Fats and oils can be attacked by various fat-splitting microorganisms if the conditions for growth are favorable, e.g. temperature, moisture, availability of low-molecular weight nutrients. Enzymes produced by contaminating lipolytic flora can hydrolyze the fat to yield free fatty acids and trigger fatty acid oxidation. At the same time, fats and oils can protect microorganisms so that they may survive for quite some time (Troller and Christian, 1978; Hersom and Hulland, 1980; Gaze, 1985). This would present a hazard in particular if the organisms were infectious pathogens.

Keywords

Sorbic Acid Potassium Sorbate Aerobic Plate Count Salad Dressing Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, New York 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. A. Roberts{roJoint Chairman}
  • J.-L. Cordier
  • L. Gram
  • R. B. Tompkin
  • J. I. Pitt{roJoint Chairman}
  • L. G. M. Gorris
  • K. M. J. Swanson

There are no affiliations available

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