DNA Packaging by Bacteriophage P22

  • Sherwood Casjens
  • Peter Weigele
Part of the Molecular Biology Intelligence Unit book series (MBIU)

Keywords

Hydrolysis Hydration Recombination Polysaccharide Encapsulation 

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Copyright information

© Eurekah.com and Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sherwood Casjens
    • 1
  • Peter Weigele
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PathologyUniversity of Utah Medical SchoolSalt Lake CityUSA
  2. 2.Biology DepartmentMassachusetts Institute of TechnologyCambridgeUSA

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