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Applying DBT Mindfulness Skills to the Treatment of Clients with Anxiety Disorders

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Acceptance and Mindfulness-Based Approaches to Anxiety

Part of the book series: Series in Anxiety and Related Disorders ((SARD))

Abstract

Clinicians and researchers have increasingly begun to acknowledge the potential benefits of incorporating acceptance- and mindfulness-based approaches into cognitive-behavioral treatments for the anxiety disorders (see Orsillo, Roemer, Block, Lejeune, & Herbert, 2004; Orsillo, Roemer, Block-Lerner, & Tull, 2004). As such, the past several years have seen the development of innovative mindfulness- and acceptance-based cognitivebehavioral treatments for several anxiety disorders, including generalized anxiety disorder (Roemer & Orsillo, 2002), panic disorder (PD; Karekla & Forsyth, 2004), posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD; Orsillo & Batten, 2005), and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD; Singh,Wahler,Winton, & Adkins, 2004). Evidence in support of these treatments is provided by both preliminary data on their efficacy (Karekla & Forsyth, 2004; Roemer & Orsillo, 2004) and basic research on the potential benefits of emotional acceptance (relative to suppression) within PD (Levitt, Brown, Orsillo, & Barlow, 2004) and among individuals with heightened anxiety sensitivity (Eifert & Heffner, 2003).

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Gratz, K.L., Tull, M.T., Wagner, A.W. (2005). Applying DBT Mindfulness Skills to the Treatment of Clients with Anxiety Disorders. In: Orsillo, S.M., Roemer, L. (eds) Acceptance and Mindfulness-Based Approaches to Anxiety. Series in Anxiety and Related Disorders. Springer, Boston, MA. https://doi.org/10.1007/0-387-25989-9_6

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