The Biogeographic History of Mesoamerican Primates

  • Susan M. Ford
Part of the Developments in Primatology: Progress and Prospects book series (DIPR)

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References

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Authors and Affiliations

  • Susan M. Ford
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Anthropology, Center for Systematic BiologySouthern Illinois UniversityCarbondale

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