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SIV Infection of Macaques as a Model for AIDS Drug Studies

  • Koen K. A. van Rompay
  • Raman P. Singh
  • Marta L. Marthas
Chapter
Part of the Infectious Diseases and Pathogenesis book series (IAPA)

Abstract

An increasing arsenal of anti-HIV drugs is currently being used, and many new candidates are continuously being developed. Based on their viral targets during the viral replication cycle, the main antiviral drugs that have been approved or are being developed belong to several groups: inhibitors of attachment, fusion, reverse transcriptase (RT), integrase or protease (Figure 1). During recent years, combination therapy of these compounds, so-called highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), has led to major improvement in the clinical management of HIV-infected people in the developed countries. Despite this considerable success, there is still much room for improvement, as not everyone can experience the desired longterm benefits. Once established, HIV infection can probably never be cured, so long-term administration of these drugs is usually required for the majority of individuals, and problems of toxicity, compliance, drug resistance, and costs become very relevant. In addition, due to the current costs of antiviral drugs and the need for expertise monitoring of viral and immunological parameters and toxicity, current drug regimens are beyond the reach of the majority of HIV-infected people who live in developing countries.

Keywords

Rhesus Macaque Antiviral Drug Pigtailed Macaque Antiviral Immune Response Nonhuman Primate Model 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Koen K. A. van Rompay
    • 1
  • Raman P. Singh
    • 1
  • Marta L. Marthas
    • 1
  1. 1.California National Primate Research CenterUniversity of CaliforniaDavis

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