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The Probabilistic Reasoning of Middle School Students

  • Jane Watson
Part of the Mathematics Education Library book series (MELI, volume 40)

Keywords

Middle School Probabilistic Reasoning Middle School Student Annual Conference Mathematic Education Research 
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jane Watson

There are no affiliations available

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