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An Overview of Research into the Teaching and Learning of Probability

  • Graham A. Jones
  • Carol A. Thornton
Part of the Mathematics Education Library book series (MELI, volume 40)

Keywords

Mathematics Education Sample Space Target Event Unpublished Doctoral Dissertation Educational Study 
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© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2005

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  • Graham A. Jones
  • Carol A. Thornton

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