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Teaching and Learning the Mathematization of Uncertainty: Historical, Cultural, Social and Political Contexts

  • Brian Greer
  • Swapna Mukhopadhyay
Part of the Mathematics Education Library book series (MELI, volume 40)

Keywords

Mathematics Education Subjective Probability Political Context National Curriculum School Subject 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brian Greer
  • Swapna Mukhopadhyay

There are no affiliations available

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