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Probability and Statistical Inference: How Can Teachers Enable Learners to Make the Connection?

  • Maxine Pfannkuch
Part of the Mathematics Education Library book series (MELI, volume 40)

Keywords

Statistical Inference Sampling Distribution Conceptual Understanding Pedagogical Framework Formal Inference 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Maxine Pfannkuch

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