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How Can Teachers Build Notions of Conditional Probability and Independence?

  • James E. Tarr
  • John K. Lannin
Part of the Mathematics Education Library book series (MELI, volume 40)

Keywords

Conditional Probability Sample Space Middle School Student Colored Chip Student Thinking 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • James E. Tarr
  • John K. Lannin

There are no affiliations available

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