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Connecting the Study of Entrepreneurship and Theories of Capitalist Progress An Epilogue

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Part of the International Handbook Series on Entrepreneurship book series (IHSE,volume 1)

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  • Real Option
  • Dark Side
  • Corporate Entrepreneurship
  • Harvard Business School
  • Creative Destruction

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McGrath, R.G. (2003). Connecting the Study of Entrepreneurship and Theories of Capitalist Progress An Epilogue. In: Acs, Z.J., Audretsch, D.B. (eds) Handbook of Entrepreneurship Research. International Handbook Series on Entrepreneurship, vol 1. Springer, Boston, MA. https://doi.org/10.1007/0-387-24519-7_19

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/0-387-24519-7_19

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Boston, MA

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