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Entrepreneurship as Social Construction: A Multi-level Evolutionary Approach

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Part of the International Handbook Series on Entrepreneurship book series (IHSE,volume 1)

Keywords

  • Collective Action
  • Social Construction
  • American Sociological Review
  • Trade Association
  • Nascent Entrepreneur

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Aldrich, H.E., Martinez, M. (2003). Entrepreneurship as Social Construction: A Multi-level Evolutionary Approach. In: Acs, Z.J., Audretsch, D.B. (eds) Handbook of Entrepreneurship Research. International Handbook Series on Entrepreneurship, vol 1. Springer, Boston, MA. https://doi.org/10.1007/0-387-24519-7_15

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