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Collecting Drug Use Data from Different Populations

  • Edward M. Adlaf

Keywords

Ecstasy User Mode Difference School Survey Hide Population General Population Survey 
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© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edward M. Adlaf
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, and Departments of Public Health Sciences and PsychiatryUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada

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