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Knowledge Communication in Design Communities

  • Gerhard Fischer
  • Jonathan Ostwald
Part of the Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning Series book series (CULS, volume 5)

Abstract

Design is a rich domain in which to investigate barriers and biases in computer-supported communication because it involves many different modes of communication in social-technical contexts. This chapter briefly describes different design approaches. It analyzes the biases and barriers of two different types of design communities: communities of practice and communities of interest. To address the communication challenges between diverse design communities, boundary objects are needed to establish common ground and shared understanding in the context of complex design tasks.

We explore the unique possibilities that computational media have to support our conceptual framework. Our work is based on the fundamental belief that there is no media-independent communication and interaction—that tools, materials, and social arrangements are always involved in some way in these activities. The possibilities and the practice of design are functions of the media with which we design. We present examples of such environments from our work.

Keywords

Boundary Object Shared Understanding Participatory Design Collaborative Design Knowledge Communication 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gerhard Fischer
  • Jonathan Ostwald

There are no affiliations available

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